Sparks of Light

A holistic approach to wellness

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A lot of my clients have had disappointing experiences of conventional medicine, perhaps a chronic condition where a solution has not been found or a series of symptoms that have been dismissed and not taken seriously, or past experiences have given them good reason not to rely on or trust modern orthodox medicine. For some, like me, a more holistic approach is their first choice in exploring and uncovering what might lie underneath their symptoms or dis- ease. This is not to say that modern medicine doesn’t play a very important role in maintaining our health, but as an alternative practitioner I tend to see clients who are making a choice to try something different.

 

For me I tend to go to a doctor as a last resort, and sometimes this is the best option.  I aim to allow myself to be intuitively guided as to where to start looking for help, if that is needed, or to simply allow things to heal themselves or I might, for example, be guided to journal, do yoga, walk or get into nature. Not everything needs intervention which is something western medicine tends to favour but I don't believe is always the best option. If our bodies are balanced and in alignment then all the different parts of us – mind, body, ego, soul and higher self - are synchronised to operate as a whole and will trigger the body’s innate intelligence to self heal.

 

I chose to see a doctor recently to investigate a painful wrist as a result of tripping over some rutted ground. Some x rays were authorised and these came back clear. As my wrist was still a bit swollen and painful I returned for some advice to be told the fall had most likely triggered arthritis and this was the explanation for the continuing swelling and pain. Fair enough. But I then mentioned that I would look into ways of helping myself, seek nutritional advice as I was aware that diet can have an impact on reducing symptoms. To which his reply was that I must be getting confused between osteoporosis and arthritis because diet can have an effect on osteoporosis but not arthritis.

 

I chose not to argue but felt a bit annoyed and quite frankly disappointed that a member of the medical establishment, to whom we trust and look to for advice, did not appear to have any understanding of the link between diet and a common inflammatory condition like arthritis. This is coming from a young doctor who would have trained in recent years and therefore would have relatively up to date medical knowledge but any knowledge around the impact of diet was clearly not part of his training.

 

I'm lucky in that I've got an understanding that will be useful in working out for myself how to support a condition like arthritis but not everyone who will be impacted by this diagnosis will have access to that information.

 

I am left with a feeling that many, if not most will be left feeling disempowered and unaware that holistic choices and lifestyle changes could critically support them in a positive way for their future health. We have more control than you think and while I don't have all the answers I can ask questions. I can feel empowered rather than limited. I can feel hopeful that I can explore alternative approaches that will support me and assist healing. I know I can connect with my body and listen to its innate intelligence and be guided in the direction I choose to follow.

 

My hope, in the long term, is for a more integrative approach to healthcare, the option to combine the latest understanding using a conventional medical approach, where needed, with holistic alternatives exploring root causes of dis-ease as opposed to focusing on eliminating surface symptoms, which so often leads to further treatment side effects. In an ideal world it would be good to see the medical profession consider the whole person when diagnosing and prescribing treatment options and to embody a greater recognition and respect for the gentler potential of a holistic approach.

A lot of my clients have had disappointing experiences of conventional medicine, perhaps a chronic condition where a solution has not been found or a series of symptoms that have been dismissed and not taken seriously, or past experiences have given them good reason not to rely on or trust modern orthodox medicine. For some, like me, a more holistic approach is their first choice in exploring and uncovering what might lie underneath their symptoms or dis- ease. This is not to say that modern medicine doesn’t play a very important role in maintaining our health, but as an alternative practitioner I tend to see clients who are making a choice to try something different.

 

For me I tend to go to a doctor as a last resort, and sometimes this is the best option.  I aim to allow myself to be intuitively guided as to where to start looking for help, if that is needed, or to simply allow things to heal themselves or I might, for example, be guided to journal, do yoga, walk or get into nature. Not everything needs intervention which is something western medicine tends to favour but I don't believe is always the best option. If our bodies are balanced and in alignment then all the different parts of us – mind, body, ego, soul and higher self - are synchronised to operate as a whole and will trigger the body’s innate intelligence to self heal.

 

I chose to see a doctor recently to investigate a painful wrist as a result of tripping over some rutted ground. Some x rays were authorised and these came back clear. As my wrist was still a bit swollen and painful I returned for some advice to be told the fall had most likely triggered arthritis and this was the explanation for the continuing swelling and pain. Fair enough. But I then mentioned that I would look into ways of helping myself, seek nutritional advice as I was aware that diet can have an impact on reducing symptoms. To which his reply was that I must be getting confused between osteoporosis and arthritis because diet can have an effect on osteoporosis but not arthritis........

 

I chose not to argue but felt a bit annoyed and quite frankly disappointed that a member of the medical establishment, to whom we trust and look to for advice, did not appear to have any understanding of the link between diet and a common inflammatory condition like arthritis. This is coming from a young doctor who would have trained in recent years and therefore would have relatively up to date medical knowledge but any knowledge around the impact of diet was clearly not part of his training.

 

I'm lucky in that I've got an understanding that will be useful in working out for myself how to support a condition like arthritis but not everyone who will be impacted by this diagnosis will have access to that information.

 

I am left with a feeling that many, if not most will be left feeling disempowered and unaware that holistic choices and lifestyle changes could critically support them in a positive way for their future health. We have more control than you think and while I don't have all the answers I can ask questions. I can feel empowered rather than limited. I can feel hopeful that I can explore alternative approaches that will support me and assist healing. I know I can connect with my body and listen to its innate intelligence and be guided in the direction I choose to follow.

 

My hope, in the long term, is for a more integrative approach to healthcare, the option to combine the latest understanding using a conventional medical approach, where needed, with holistic alternatives exploring root causes of dis-ease as opposed to focusing on eliminating surface symptoms, which so often leads to further treatment side effects. In an ideal world it would be good to see the medical profession consider the whole person when diagnosing and prescribing treatment options and to embody a greater recognition and respect for the gentler potential of a holistic approach.

A lot of my clients have had disappointing experiences of conventional medicine, perhaps a chronic condition where a solution has not been found or a series of symptoms that have been dismissed and not taken seriously, or past experiences have given them good reason not to rely on or trust modern orthodox medicine. For some, like me, a more holistic approach is their first choice in exploring and uncovering what might lie underneath their symptoms or dis- ease. This is not to say that modern medicine doesn’t play a very important role in maintaining our health, but as an alternative practitioner I tend to see clients who are making a choice to try something different.

 

For me I tend to go to a doctor as a last resort, and sometimes this is the best option.  I aim to allow myself to be intuitively guided as to where to start looking for help, if that is needed, or to simply allow things to heal themselves or I might, for example, be guided to journal, do yoga, walk or get into nature. Not everything needs intervention which is something western medicine tends to favour but I don't believe is always the best option. If our bodies are balanced and in alignment then all the different parts of us – mind, body, ego, soul and higher self - are synchronised to operate as a whole and will trigger the body’s innate intelligence to self heal.

 

I chose to see a doctor recently to investigate a painful wrist as a result of tripping over some rutted ground. Some x rays were authorised and these came back clear. As my wrist was still a bit swollen and painful I returned for some advice to be told the fall had most likely triggered arthritis and this was the explanation for the continuing swelling and pain. Fair enough. But I then mentioned that I would look into ways of helping myself, seek nutritional advice as I was aware that diet can have an impact on reducing symptoms. To which his reply was that I must be getting confused between osteoporosis and arthritis because diet can have an effect on osteoporosis but not arthritis.

 

I chose not to argue but felt a bit annoyed and quite frankly disappointed that a member of the medical establishment, to whom we trust and look to for advice, did not appear to have any understanding of the link between diet and a common inflammatory condition like arthritis. This is coming from a young doctor who would have trained in recent years and therefore would have relatively up to date medical knowledge but any knowledge around the impact of diet was clearly not part of his training.

 

I'm lucky in that I've got an understanding that will be useful in working out for myself how to support a condition like arthritis but not everyone who will be impacted by this diagnosis will have access to that information.

 

I am left with a feeling that many, if not most will be left feeling disempowered and unaware that holistic choices and lifestyle changes could critically support them in a positive way for their future health. We have more control than you think and while I don't have all the answers I can ask questions. I can feel empowered rather than limited. I can feel hopeful that I can explore alternative approaches that will support me and assist healing. I know I can connect with my body and listen to its innate intelligence and be guided in the direction I choose to follow.

 

My hope, in the long term, is for a more integrative approach to healthcare, the option to combine the latest understanding using a conventional medical approach, where needed, with holistic alternatives exploring root causes of dis-ease as opposed to focusing on eliminating surface symptoms, which so often leads to further treatment side effects. In an ideal world it would be good to see the medical profession consider the whole person when diagnosing and prescribing treatment options and to embody a greater recognition and respect for the gentler potential of a holistic approach.

Sxx